Na Na pinches her pennies (aka frugal living)

Shh… don't tell anyone I'm poor. They all think I'm living frugal and green just like everyone these days. This is a blog about a senior citizen living a frugal life, on a fixed income, in a low income food desert, and passing along knowledge from lessons learned. Some she learned from her Grandma Mama many years ago and some learned only a few days ago.

Food banks and discount bins

I always get really quiet on my blog during a holiday.  I kept myself busy in the kitchen and sorting more stuff.  So let me tell you what I’ve gotten done the last few days.

I went to the mobile food bank a couple of days before Thanksgiving.  This is what they gave me.  I also got a small bag of catfish nuggets that are in the freezer.  I’m never lucky enough to get a turkey from any of the holiday food give away programs.  I don’t have young kids and I don’t get snap benefits so I don’t qualify for a holiday basket from any charity.  I usually buy a turkey breast or two  on sale which is good enough.

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I put the potatoes in the fridge and the other food in the pantry.  I used the cabbage to start a batch of sauerkraut.  I do love sauerkraut.  It takes about six weeks to make a five pound batch.

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I’m wishing I had another jar like that so I could start another batch.  There was about two pounds left so I dehydrated it to be used in soups.

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I canned 25 half pints of mandarin oranges from the discount bin at the store. It takes about two mandarins for each half pint jar.

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I dehydrated 5 pounds of oranges also from the discount bin at the store.  I don’t know what kind but they were larger than the mandarins, smaller than regular oranges, more tart, and totally seedless.

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I  chopped and dehydrated onions I got from the commodity center this month and some from a discount bin.

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I needed to bake a loaf of bread for sandwiches.  I decided to take advantage of the heat in the oven so I also baked biscuits, corn bread, and a chocolate cake.

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Those went into the freezer for individual servings.  Even the bread was sliced to put into the freezer.  I didn’t put icing on the cake.  That makes it more like a muffin for snacking.

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I had a request to bake someone else a loaf of bread so I baked another loaf.  While the oven was still hot I baked another turkey breast and cut it up for the freezer.  I wish I had gotten a couple more while they were on sale.

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My food storage was in total disarray which makes it difficult to be rotating it.  It was time to clean it up and make things easier to find.

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Its much better now that like items are together and the jars are on the selves instead of stacked in the corner.  Some stuff was transferred to the kitchen where there is another shelf unit like these.  I’ll be organizing it one day this week.

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I also had an appointment with the dentist for a fitting of the new wax denture mold.  I’m extremely happy with how it felt.  Not at all too big.  More like natural.  I had no gag response at all and I was able to close my mouth normally.  The school will be going on winter break in a few days so it will be mid January before I see the dentist again.  That’s when I get the actual dentures.  I’m anxious to get back to eating real food but I’m sure glad he’s making them over.

When I moved here to this house I was happy to know a Kroger store was within walking distance.  I could check the discount bin more often and it was much easier to pick up my diabetes medication.  A little over a week ago we found out the store is closing permanently.  There was no announcement; just quickly emptying shelves making people curious enough to ask what was going on. This is very strange because that store was just remodeled last summer.  The last day is Monday, November 27 at 5 pm.  I was sad to find out because the closing puts me right back into a food dessert again and no place close for medicines either.  Life just keeps getting more difficult.

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43 comments on “Food banks and discount bins

  1. T
    December 16, 2016

    I have been shopping at our two local Kroger stores this season and I don’t know why but there is a real competition going on, Kroger is literally giving things away on a daily basis, I’ve had free cookies, free soda, free beans, free bbq sauce, free cake mix, free peanuts, free candy three times…admittedly the free stuff isn’t always healthiest but I have been amazed at how they are really determined to take over the whole supermarket environment.

    The best offers have been from their digital download coupons. But today, 10 lb bag flour= 99 cents. Last week 5 lb potatoes= 99 cents. Today I got $6 off for spending $60.

    In a food desert there is none of this competition leading to special offers.

    • Anita
      December 16, 2016

      You are right. In a food dessert the people have very limited choices. In my area I can’t find any discounted food bins at Kroger any more. Be watchful to see that its not leading up to store closings. That sounds familiar to the happenings we had here before three closed.

      • T
        December 17, 2016

        This ‘supermarket wars’ definitely closed stores last time it happened here in @ 2010, but where I live there are literally hundreds of grocery stores, it’s unlikely to turn into a food desert in my part of town except for people who don’t have heir own transportation- some of these huge communities being established have few shopping facilities and no public transport.

        One of my deals today was a large boston butt pork roast for $2…

        Saw a nice thing today, a woman left her cash at the self checkout and the guy who works there chased after her to give it back. He’s always so helpful and kind. I am going to buy him a giftcard for Christmas : )

        • Anita
          December 17, 2016

          You’ve HAVE been getting some really great bargains. The discount bins have disappeared in the stores I shop and its very unlikely we’ll have any kind of store war here.

  2. James Schaupp
    December 12, 2016

    This is more of a FYI for diabetics that require insulin. My mother is a severe diabetic, in her 60’s and has been a diabetic since her early teen years. She retired after 30 years as a surgical nurse and had to pay outlandish prices for Insulin such as Atlantis and Humalog. Her insulin was expensive and was always in the donut hole. She found a rural older doctor that told her there was over the counter insulin. He was a doctor I believe in the former USSR and Poland. She said something about it and I called the pharmacies around here (rural Nebraska) and the cheapest was, though I hate to say it Wal-Mart for $24.95 a vial for generic over the counter insulin. She can handle a $125 month for insulin, but couldn’t before. I have been following you for a long time. I found your old quilting blog before you moved to wordpress. I hope this helps someone else that is having trouble affording their insulin. And the $24.95 a vial is full price not the co-pay. I pick it up for her and just go to the pharmacist and ask for a vial of insulin.

    • Anita
      December 13, 2016

      Oh! I had no idea there was an over the counter insulin. I have a friend that can seriously use this information. I’m going to pass it along to her and her husband. Thanks for telling us.

  3. Julie harris
    December 4, 2016

    You rock! Your posts are inspiring to me. Your attitude is the kind of attitude that this world needs to see and hear every day. Thank you for your wisdom.

    • Anita
      December 5, 2016

      I don’t think I do anything special. Its the “old person” in me who wants to leave the world a bit of myself when its my time to leave it.

  4. Margie in Toronto
    November 30, 2016

    I am always very impressed with all the effort you make to ensure that nothing goes to waste! It must be hard work and you could certainly give lessons to many of us!

    Sorry to hear about the supermarket closing – it must be so discouraging. I attended a Food Bank/Community Outreach orientation session last week (I’m looking to do some volunteer work) and one of the things they talked about is people living in a food desert. I’d certainly heard the term before but I’d never experienced it myself. This Centre is in a poorer section of town and it was very evident as I rode the bus there that there weren’t any regular grocery stores close by – just expensive convenience stores. One of the service this centre offers is the opportunity for people in the neighbourhood to purchase low cost, good food – much of which they grow themselves in community gardens and greenhouses – I was very impressed with the thought put into everything. They also run a community “restaurant” and feed 200 people for breakfast and for lunch each day – no questions asked.

    However do you manage on $20/month? Sorry, was this mentioned in a prior post? I don’t understand why Govt. agencies don’t offer more help to people such as yourself or to more of the “working poor” – sometimes people just need that little bit extra to make life a wee bit easier – but it never seems to work out that way.

    Thank you for all the lessons you pass along to the rest of us.

    • Anita
      November 30, 2016

      Visiting a food bank in a food dessert is an eye opener isn’t it? I read or hear well meaning people often saying “if only poor people understood nutrition they could live better” and I say BULL CRAP! Knowing about good nutrition is worthless if you don’t have access to nutritious food. Every food bank, in every location has its own criteria. Some are better than others. Our food bank system is sorely out of date and not going to change anytime soon. What I worry about most, as both an observer and a participant, is those without access to the dessert food bank. I’m talking about the people who are not able to get out of their house because of a handicap or even those who could get to the food bank but it would be impossible to carry the food home. Think about a person in a wheel chair but no car. Sure they could get to the mobile food bank on a bus. They could even wait in the line. But how would they carry the food home on a bus? Most people I know in wheel chairs struggle just to maneuver the chair without bundles to carry too. The same type person living in a rural area where there are no buses would just be out of luck. Its a sad state of affairs that the homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and food banks are expanding. They should be shrinking.

      A friend once said to me that nothing seemed to get me down. She said when a boulder came into my path that I just found a way around it and kept going. I told her; the boulder IS my path. Of course I get discouraged sometimes and may even go on a rant but I don’t stay that way very long. There is no point in worrying about or stressing over what I cannot control. I believe every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve ourselves. To find a better way to do things. I’m actually doing ok with $20 a month. The mobile food bank gives me plenty to eat and the money fills in the rest. I’ll write a couple of posts about how I manage.

      • T
        December 1, 2016

        that’s interesting you say the food bank system is outdated, I’ve never shopped at any of ours but I do notice when they ask for donations at the local one it’s generally canned sausages, jelly, spaghettios, boxed cereal sort of thing; I could not eat that myself and stay healthy. Last winter they posted a notice requesting no more donations of soup, they had enough! which I also thought a bit strange, soup being slightly healthier canned food.

        There is a good food bank in town which hands out produce etc but I could not get there without a car, and as you say lugging a box of produce on a bus isn’t very practical anyway.

        ‘ Its a sad state of affairs that the homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and food banks are expanding. They should be shrinking.’

        it’s weird, I live in one of the best zip codes where the new houses being built are upwards of $350 000, yet there are now thrift stores everywhere.

        After reading your blog I notice more now when I am driving through different areas which ones would be food deserts, and they are generally poorer areas. Some may have fast food shacks and as you say gas stations with food, but options are limited.

        However on some of these massive luxury communities there aren’t many amenities either- the assumption is people will get into their cars and drive to the nearest super-market or strip. So if those people fell into situations without transport they would be isolated too, and I don’t see bus stops in those communities ( which have become very popular here )

        I’ve volunteered at a local church food service for the elderly and disabled, the volunteers deliver lunch time complete meals on weekdays, it’s a useful service not just the meal but a daily point of contact for the shut-in person.

        But I am guessing it depends on how well-organized the local charities etc are, some areas are probably not served at all.

        Over the summer the libraries provided soup kitchens for local children, via a local food bank/ meal service, I don’t remember this being necessary in previous years, though a previous local library leader told me they always keep in food ( like pop tarts or granola bars ) for hungry kids who come in, she also said some of the kids were there the whole day when school is closed.

        I was thinking what would I buy if I just had $20, it would be oatmeal, rice, carrots, cabbage, bananas and whatever is a bargain. The krogers here have $1 bags of produce which is often perfectly useable, bruised apples, older turnips etc.

        Since you said about your local Kroger closing I have noticed the one closest to me is getting rather run down, and yes, two of the nicer parts of this zip code just opened the giant super-Krogers.

        • T
          December 1, 2016

          oh, I looked for iron tonic wine, I remember that too, doesn’t seem to be around any more? Maybe I can try molasses, we used to be given a tablespoon of that too.

          • T
            December 1, 2016

            oh and one last comment ( I have written a lot haven’t I this week?! ) you were saying about doing people’s job for them…I wrote to the 311 city service to report a dumped mattress in the road. Received an email later asking me to CALL 311, too much trouble for someone to put in the service request themselves I suppose!

        • Anita
          December 1, 2016

          The food items you said were requested are the things that can be eaten without cooking. Thats because many families getting food from a food bank have had their utilities turned off. Or are the homeless who don’t have a way to cook. Canned meats are already cooked. Box cereal is eaten without milk. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches or canned cheese on crackers are popular with homeless. Food bank foods are not meant to be healthy…. just keep you alive. I say the food banks are outdated only because the ones in our area do not ask if a person has access to a way to cook. They don’t ask if the people have dietary restrictions either. You go in, fill out the paperwork, they hand you a box, tell you that you can only come back once every four months, and have a nice day.

          Now on the other hand I’ve heard about the food banks in New York City (I think) and other places where the food bank is set up like a grocery store. Each item on the shelves have “point values” instead of price. The healthier and fresher a food the less points it costs to encourage healthy eating. Each recipient is told how many points they qualify for and its the recipient who chooses what goes into their box. The points do not have to be used all at one time. They can be stretched out over a month’s time. A homeless person would have different needs than a family with a working stove and fridge. An older diabetic would have different needs than those of a healthy young couple. In food banks with point systems the donations stretch much farther than those that pre-pack boxes identically for everyone. See the difference?

          To know which neighborhoods are food desserts, look for corner stores, liquor stores, and fast food every couple of blocks and lots of empty houses. My $20 grocery budget is only for non-edible items. My edibles come from the mobile food bank. Canning makes my food bank food stretch much farther.

  5. sarasinart
    November 30, 2016

    You have been very busy! Sorry about the store. Is there anything else at all close?

    • Anita
      November 30, 2016

      Nothing but three corner convenience type that mostly sell gas. I’m about mid-way between two regular grocery stores on the bus line. There is an Aldi about 6 miles going south (next door to the new Kroger) and a Save A Lot about 7 miles going north. There is two other groceries one to the east and one to the west of where I live but both would require two bus transfers going and two bus transfers returning. I’ll just have to go back to only shopping once a month when I drive my SIL for her big shopping day and if I need something in between take that long bus ride.

      • sarasinart
        November 30, 2016

        That’s sad. Maybe another store will open where the one is closing.

        • Anita
          November 30, 2016

          That’s what we are all hoping for. Another store like a Save A Lot or an Aldi would be nice.

          • sarasinart
            November 30, 2016

            Yea they are both good stores. Good luck, fingers crossed for you.

  6. T
    November 28, 2016

    I did try to post a comment, don’t know if it went through, lot of rigmarole with wordpress!

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      It came through alright. Don’t you hate when they make changes without telling anyone?

  7. T
    November 28, 2016

    Sorry to hear about the Kroger, it is sad isn’t it that the tiny shops were wiped out by the grocery stores, now they are being wiped out by the megastores…

    $20 a month is not much at all, even eating oatmeal, jam/toast, baked beans/toast and a banana each day, $20 would not cover it.

    Good thing you have the food bank.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      My budget was much better before I sold my house and moved here. I had no house payment because the house was paid for and I had extra income from quilting. Now there is a house payment to make and no extra income. This makes the money really tight. The way I look at it, twenty dollars is better than no dollars.

      • T
        November 28, 2016

        We just had a tight year too, my home is paid for and I have no debt, but on the poverty line it’s impossible to budget for health care so I mostly did without again. I treat my diabetes with the cheapest drugs possible and other medical/dental/optical needs just go undone, nothing else I can do.

        Work has picked up loads since the presidential election, so hopefully I will get more health care in 2017. I have to buy on healthcare.gov and my 2016 policy has gone up over 400% on premiums, so I’ll have to pick another plan. Sad thing is they aren’t great plans, all rely on referrals from a pcp doctor, and a very limited number of specialists- the so called ‘narrow networks’. I just buy it hoping in an emergency I’d be covered- the law says I should be! The copays/ deductibles/ coinsurance etc are ridiculously high on many policies, but even a modest amount to pay is a lot if there’s little or no money coming in. And there’s a lot of tricky fine print, stuff that’s not fully covered or not covered at all.

        I am very good at budgeting food and living on the Kroger bargains and seasonal prices ( like yams 15 cents a pound this last week ) but I could not feed myself properly on $20 a month, it’s more like $20 a week minimum for the two of us, and that’s a bare bones basically healthy diet.

        Kroger still knocks down meat and produce prices here, but for bread it’s the cheap dollar sliced loaf or $1.49 minimum for one of their bakery last day reductions. The quality sliced bread I don’t know what happens to it, but it’s never on offer.

        The Kroger closest to me has a poor meat and fish department, the fish smells…fishy not fresh, and the reduced meat is nasty!

        But they do have some good deals some weeks and I stock up a bit then. Another supermarket reduces ground sirloin and ground buffalo to $1.99 a pound at the end of a day, I always buy it if I am out and see it, I don’t enjoy the cheap quality ground beef.

        I hope your business and income increases in the new year.

        Is the closing Kroger having any closing down offers?

        • Anita
          November 29, 2016

          The Kroger is now closed. I went there today for the last time and the store was nearly empty. No, no closing down offers. Most of the stuff was in carts ready to go to the new store. Not many bargains at all. They had only a few 70% off meat and dairy items. I left without buying anything because there was nothing discounted that I normally use.

          Cooking from scratch is my key to getting by on very little money. I couldn’t feed myself on $20 a month if I didn’t know how to make the best use of what I do buy added to the stuff from food banks. For example I can buy a five pound bag of all purpose flour (1.89) and a jar of yeast (2.59) to make lots of things. Like bread, pizza crust, bread sticks, hamburger/hot dog buns, pie crusts, gravy, cake, coating mix, pancakes/waffles, donuts, cookies, tortillas, and so forth. Knowing how to preserve the food bank foods to be used later is a bonus for getting by on next to nothing.

          I believe EVERYTHING we know and depend on is going to be changing after the new year. I don’t know anything for sure. Its just a feeling I have. I’m hoping that I’m wrong about it. Maybe its just my own life that’s changing and I feel like its the world.

          I’ve been looking a part D plans. I called the SS KIPDA line and was told they can’t help me unless *I* set up a place in a library or a community center for them to meet with several seniors at one time. Useless people! Why should I be the one to do their job for them? Its supposed to be their job to set up meetings then invite people to be there. I’ll probably just stay with the plan I have. Thats not wise but at least I know the company already.

          • T
            November 29, 2016

            Sorry about that, when stores have closed here they had great deals which at least softened the blow.

            I too have had that feeling. A sense of unease about the credibility of our leaders, especially in America. It feels a bit like the values of democracy have shifted, the needs of the people are less important than the profit interests of detached corporations.

            I saw a television ad for hunger in America today and wondered, why are they paying all that money for television advertising, instead of giving it directly to those who will benefit…and I think the same about health insurance companies and lots of the government agencies now- they cost a fortune, make a favored few wealthy and serve no useful purpose!

            So you are supposed to recruit your own support group?! Unbelievable. But it just shows how many of these subsidized organizations or fake-charities or government agencies are not helping people.

            Yes, it’s bad enough we have to spend hours on the ‘phone verifying these insurances and what is covered, whether the directories are up to date etc. never mind set up our own assistance!

            Sometimes it feels like doing *everyone’s* job already. But the one time I left it to the woman whose job it was in the dr office she forgot to file the paperwork trail then the insurance refused the claim.

            While I was on the ‘phone enrolling for my 2017 ‘obamacare’ it came on CNN news that the new health secretary plans to abolish it a.s.a.p. So maybe a waste of time anyway ( and money! bet no one says let’s refund people their unused premiums…)

            I have diabetes and bowel disease so a lot of flour based foods won’t be great for me, I can generally eat boiled white rice but not a lot of beans.

            The yams weighed about a pound each so 15 cents, I ate with sour cream, so each = about a 30 cent meal.

            I can eat bananas, eggs, small amount of plain yoghurt, carrots, cabbage, cauliflower, potatoes, oatmeal.

            Milk or juice I always dilute 50 % with water. And I drink a lot of filtered water. I buy evaporated milk a can a week for hot tea or coffee.

            I LOVE pancakes, the European thin crepe style but without the extra melted butter, they are great served with melted cheese or with a tiny sprinkle of sugar plus lemon or lime juice.

            I really need to find a good source of iron- affordable and digestible, my blood tests always run anemic now.

            • Anita
              November 29, 2016

              When I was a child Grandma Mama gave me about an ounce of dark wine each day, like a tonic, for my anemia. I never wanted to eat. She also cooked in cast iron which helps too. Its just my personal opinion but I believe sauerkraut a super food for improving anemia and overall health and its digestible. If you can eat cabbage then sauerkraut is better for you. I always feel better after eating it. Its been used for centuries as a medicinal food against all types of illnesses. Sailors used to eat it in colonial times to prevent illness on long ocean voyages. It can’t hurt to give it a try. I also take a one a day vitamin with iron everyday.

          • Roberta
            January 25, 2017

            Anita, If you or your readers are just living on Social Security call the office and ask about getting “extra help”. I was there changing my address and saw the sign & asked if I was elegible. I was. Extra help pays for…Part D premium and Part B premium and part of my copays. Try it.

            • Anita
              January 26, 2017

              Thanks Roberta for the reminder. I hope it helps a reader or two. I do get extra help but it doesn’t pay all my premiums. Only part and a couple of co-pays of meds that are generic. Every case is different and every state has different rules.

  8. Jasna
    November 28, 2016

    Thank you for sharing your experience, Anita. We still have the jar our great grandmother used for making sauerkraut. I think I should try to make some. Do you put weights on top of the shredded cabbage? In my family they used to put a couple of stones.

    I SO enjoy your posts. I wait for them eagerly!!!
    Hugs from Patagonia.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      Hi Jasna, Be very careful with the old kraut jars. Most of them had lead in them before we understood the dangers of lead. I use a brine filled plastic freezer bag but my Grandma Mama used rocks too.

  9. Leslie Saunders
    November 28, 2016

    Anita, so sorry about the Kroger in your neighborhood. Here in Az., we have Frys which is connected to Kroger. It sells Kroger items. We go there on the first Weds. Of the month for the 10 % senior discounts plus coupons, but our big shopping is a once monthly trip to Winco, which is like Aldi’s. We make an outing out of this by enjoying the dollar biscuits and gravy at a local spot near the store, and then going in with a well prepared list. Once we get it all home and stocked, I just drink a nice cup of coffee out back and watch the sun set on the desert floor. Guess I’m saying, make a pleasant day out of your ventures to Aldi’s.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      The senior day here is Thursday every week and the discount is 5% off every thing including discount bin stuff. Kroger was convenient but even with the discounts Aldi is still cheaper on many things. The Aldi produce is not really good. I think that way too. Make lemonade out of the lemons. I’ll come up with something for those long bus rides. Maybe some books on cd.

  10. Emma
    November 28, 2016

    Your blog is so inspiring. I love how you make the most of what you have so it lasts awhile. I’ve only just reached a good rhythm of purchasing so I don’t waste. Next step is to get myself into canning and preserving. Sorry about the Krogers.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      Thanks Emma. Canning and preserving is addictive when you see how much money it saves. Especially when you find food in the discount bin for 10 percent of its normal cost and you know how to preserve it to last a long time.

  11. Cynthia
    November 28, 2016

    Your food storage is very impressive. I’m sure it’s quite comforting to know it is good food and it is there when you need it. So sorry to hear your Kroger is closing. It’s the only store that puts out reduced price produce that we have found. All the rest around here just put it in locked dumpsters where no one can use it and we would sure be disappointed if ours closed.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      Cynthia, I believe Kroger is downsizing and consolidating many of its stores around the country. If you see a new mega Kroger being built in your area you can be fairly sure that two or three stores surrounding it will be closed. We had a new Kroger mega store built and then three stores were closed within weeks of it opening. The new Kroger is horrible. The store layout requires people to go through like a maze. No straight through isles. It sells clothes and toys and stuff. I believe Kroger is trying to out do Walmart. The new mega store does not have reduced price items. I don’t know what they are doing with it but an employee told me they are not allowed to put reduced price stuff out. I won’t be going to Kroger anymore. If I’m forced to take a very long bus ride for groceries I’ll be going to the Aldi store next door to the new Kroger.

  12. Pat
    November 28, 2016

    Thank you so much for the update. You ar an inspiration to me. I’m so sorry to hear about the grocery store closing. I hope something else will materialize to replace it. God bless you this Christmas.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      I’m sure I’ll figure out something even if it does mean a long bus ride.

  13. Amy
    November 28, 2016

    Your blog fascinates me. A couple of questions, but only when you have time. Do you ever go through dry spells where there is no money for food purchasing, or when there is no food banks or commodities. Next question, do you ever run out of your food stash? I sure am sorry about the store close to you closing down.

    • Anita
      November 28, 2016

      Hee, hee, hee, it seems like the dry spell started when I was a kid and never ended. But seriously I’m going through one of those dry spells right now. My food stash is quite low at the moment. I had let it go down because I knew I’d be moving and wanted less to move. I gave my hugh upright freezer to my daughter and the food that was in it too. Currently I have mostly empty jars on the shelves but there is still enough to last for a couple of months if I stretch it. Moving also meant no extra income from quilting until I can get my studio set back up and working. I sure do hope my customers come back. My budget is stretched pretty thin at the moment. If I’m lucky I have $20 a month to spend on groceries.

      • Melinda
        November 28, 2016

        I’m sorry that your convenient store is closing. Just when life is going along okay, something comes along to deal with. You have a wonderful attitude though, Anita.
        I wanted to say that I’ve been reading blogs about frugality for years. I found yours not too long ago, and it’s my favorite yet. I think you’re a really neat lady. 🙂

        • Anita
          November 29, 2016

          Thank you Melinda, glad to have you as a reader. I just try to be honest that’s all.

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